Keyword

Imagery base maps earth cover

24 record(s)
 
Type of resources
Available actions
Topics
INSPIRE themes
Keywords
Contact for the resource
Provided by
Years
Representation types
Update frequencies
status
Scale
From 1 - 10 / 24
  • The Copernicus Climate Change Service is designed to respond to changes in the environment and society associated with climate change. The service will provide information for monitoring and predicting climate change and help to support adaptation and mitigation strategies. It will provide access to several climate indicators (e.g. temperature increase, sea level rise, ice sheet melting, ocean warming) and climate indices (e.g. based on records of temperature, precipitation, drought events) for both the identified climate drivers and the expected climate impacts.

  • The Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) provides regular and systematic reference information on the physical state, variability and dynamics of the ocean and marine ecosystems for the global ocean and the European regional seas. The observations and forecasts produced by the service support all marine applications. For instance, the provision of data on currents, winds and sea ice help to improve ship routing services, offshore operations or search and rescue operations, thus contributing to marine safety. The service also contributes to the protection and the sustainable management of living marine resources in particular for aquaculture, fishery research or regional fishery organisations. Physical and marine biogeochemical components are useful for water quality monitoring and pollution control. Sea level rise helps to assess coastal erosion. Sea surface temperature is one of the primary physical impacts of climate change and has direct consequences on marine ecosystems. As a result of this, the service supports a wide range of coastal and marine environment applications. Many of the data delivered by the service (e.g. temperature, salinity, sea level, currents, wind and sea ice) also play a crucial role in the domain of weather, climate and seasonal forecasting.

  • Some of today’s most important environmental concerns relate to the composition of the atmosphere. The increasing concentration of the greenhouse gases and the cooling effect of aerosol are prominent drivers of a changing climate, but the extent of their impact is often still uncertain. At the Earth’s surface, aerosols, ozone and other reactive gases such as nitrogen dioxide determine the quality of the air around us, affecting human health and life expectancy, the health of ecosystems and the fabric of the built environment. Ozone distributions in the stratosphere influence the amount of ultraviolet radiation reaching the surface. Dust, sand, smoke and volcanic aerosols affect the safe operation of transport systems and the availability of power from solar generation, the formation of clouds and rainfall, and the remote sensing by satellite of land, ocean and atmosphere. To address these environmental concerns there is a need for data and processed information. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) has been developed to meet these needs, aiming at supporting policymakers, business and citizens with enhanced atmospheric environmental information.

  • This collection contains TerraSAR-X Level 1b data acquired over the pre-defined Geohazard Supersites and a number of CEOS projects regions. The collection comprises mainly complex (SSC) with a number of detected (MGD) products. TerraSAR-X data can be ordered by a Principal Investigator (PI) of a respective Supersite region under the terms of a TerraSAR-X Science proposal accepted by DLR. Data is available for download by the Geohazard scientific community under the terms of the user license. Supersites are single sites or extended areas of high priority to the Geohazards community in which active single or multiple geological hazards pose a threat to human population and/or critical facilities. The Supersites initiative provides access to spaceborne and in-situ geophysical data of selected sites prone to earthquake, volcano or other hazards. For further information see: http://ceos.org/ourwork/workinggroups/disasters/gsnl/ Overview of permament Supersites: http://geo-gsnl.org/supersites/permanent-supersites/

  • This collection contains Sentinel-1 Level-2 Ocean (OCN) products for wind, wave and currents applications which may consist of the following geophysical components: Ocean Wind field (OWI), Ocean Swell spectra (OSW), and Surface Radial Velocity (RVL). The availability of components depends on the acquisition mode. Sentinel-1 is a polar-orbiting, all-weather, day-and-night C-band radar imaging mission funded by the European Union and carried out by the ESA within the Copernicus Programme, consisting of a constellation of two satellites. Sensor: C-SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) Repeat rate: 12 days (1 satellite), 6 days (2 satellites) Launch date: 03 April 2014 Archiving start date: 12 April 2014 Mission Status: ongoing Terms and conditions for the use of Sentinel data https://scihub.copernicus.eu/twiki/pub/SciHubWebPortal/TermsConditions/TC_Sentinel_Data_31072014.pdf Sentinel-1 Mission Overview https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/missions/sentinel-1 Sentinel-1 Level-2 OCN Products Overview https://earth.esa.int/web/sentinel/technical-guides/sentinel-1-sar/products-algorithms/level-2-algorithms Spatial resolution of Sentinel-1 Level-2 OCN data: https://sentinels.copernicus.eu/web/sentinel/user-guides/sentinel-1-sar/resolutions/level-2-ocean File format of measurement data: netCDF Suggested software: ESA SNAP/Sentinel Toolbox (http://step.esa.int/main/download/) Please note: Support for OCN-data is still limited. Sentinel-1 acquisition plans: https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/missions/sentinel-1/observation-scenario/acquisition-segments

  • This collection contains Sentinel-1 Level-1 Single Look Complex (SLC) products which consist of focused SAR data that are geo-referenced using orbit and attitude data from the satellite, and provided in slant-range geometry. Sentinel-1 is a polar-orbiting, all-weather, day-and-night C-band radar imaging mission funded by the European Union and carried out by the ESA within the Copernicus Programme, consisting of a constellation of two satellites. Sensor: C-SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) Repeat rate: 12 days (1 satellite), 6 days (2 satellites) Launch date: 03 April 2014 Archiving start date: 12 April 2014 Mission Status: ongoing Terms and conditions for the use of Sentinel data https://scihub.copernicus.eu/twiki/pub/SciHubWebPortal/TermsConditions/TC_Sentinel_Data_31072014.pdf Sentinel-1 Mission Overview https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/missions/sentinel-1 Sentinel-1 Level-1 SLC Products Overview https://earth.esa.int/web/sentinel/technical-guides/sentinel-1-sar/products-algorithms/level-1-algorithms/single-look-complex Spatial resolution of Sentinel-1 Level-1 SLC data https://sentinels.copernicus.eu/web/sentinel/user-guides/sentinel-1-sar/resolutions/level-1-single-look-complex File format of measurement data: GeoTIFF Suggested software: ESA SNAP/Sentinel Toolbox (http://step.esa.int/main/download/) Sentinel-1 acquisition plans: https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/missions/sentinel-1/observation-scenario/acquisition-segments

  • MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth is timed so that it passes from north to south across the equator in the morning, while Aqua passes south to north over the equator in the afternoon. Terra MODIS and Aqua MODIS are viewing the entire Earth's surface every 1 to 2 days, acquiring data in 36 spectral bands, or groups of wavelengths (see MODIS Technical Specifications). These data will improve our understanding of global dynamics and processes occurring on the land, in the oceans, and in the lower atmosphere. MODIS is playing a vital role in the development of validated, global, interactive Earth system models able to predict global change accurately enough to assist policy makers in making sound decisions concerning the protection of our environment (from http://modis.gsfc.nasa.gov/). On January 16, 2001 the antenna was installed on the roof of the DLR German Remote Sensing Data Center building in Oberpfaffenhofen and put into operation for MODIS reception (see http://www.dlr.de/eoc/en/desktopdefault.aspx/tabid-7251/12237_read-29022/ for more details). This mosaic has been generated from TERRA and AQUA products between 30 Sept. to 03 Oct. 2011

  • This collection contains Sentinel-3 Level-1 products recorded by the OLCI (Ocean and Land Colour) instrument. The data consist of top-of-atmosphere radiances, ortho-geolocated and re-sampled onto an along-track and across-track grid. The Sentinel-3 mission, jointly operated by ESA and EUMETSAT, is designed as a constellation of two identical polar orbiting satellites, separated by 180°, for the provision of long-term operational marine and land monitoring services. Sensor: OLCI (Ocean Land Colour Instrument) Revisit time: <2 days at the equator Launch date: 16 February 2016 Archiving start date: 29 February 2016 Mission Status: ongoing Terms and conditions for the use of Sentinel data https://scihub.copernicus.eu/twiki/pub/SciHubWebPortal/TermsConditions/TC_Sentinel_Data_31072014.pdf Sentinel-3 Mission Overview https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/missions/sentinel-3 Sentinel-3 OLCI Level-1 Products Overview https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/technical-guides/sentinel-3-olci/level-1-algorithms-products Spatial resolution of Sentinel-3 Level-1B data: https://sentinels.copernicus.eu/web/sentinel/user-guides/sentinel-3-olci/resolutions/spatial Radiometric resolution and band numbering: https://sentinels.copernicus.eu/web/sentinel/user-guides/sentinel-3-olci/resolutions/radiometric File format of measurement data: netCDF Suggested software: ESA SNAP/Sentinel Toolbox (http://step.esa.int/main/download/) Sentinel-3 OLCI coverage: https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/user-guides/sentinel-3-olci/coverage

  • This collection contains Sentinel-3 Level-1 products derived from the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR). The data consist of radiances and brightness temperatures for each pixel in a regular image grid, each view and each SLSTR channel, plus annotations data associated with SLSTR pixels. The Sentinel-3 mission, jointly operated by ESA and EUMETSAT, is designed as a constellation of two identical polar orbiting satellites, separated by 180°, for the provision of long-term operational marine and land monitoring services. Sensor: SLSTR (Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer) Revisit time: <2 days at the equator Launch date: 16 February 2016 Archiving start date: 29 February 2016 Mission Status: ongoing Terms and conditions for the use of Sentinel data https://scihub.copernicus.eu/twiki/pub/SciHubWebPortal/TermsConditions/TC_Sentinel_Data_31072014.pdf Sentinel-3 Mission Overview https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/missions/sentinel-3 Sentinel-3 SLSTR Level-1 Products Overview and Processing Levels https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/technical-guides/sentinel-3-slstr/level-1-algorithms-products https://sentinels.copernicus.eu/web/sentinel/user-guides/sentinel-3-slstr/processing-levels/level-1 Spatial resolution of Sentinel-3 SLSTR data: https://sentinels.copernicus.eu/web/sentinel/user-guides/sentinel-3-slstr/resolutions File format of measurement data: netCDF Suggested software: ESA SNAP/Sentinel Toolbox (http://step.esa.int/main/download/) Sentinel-3 SLSTR coverage: https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/user-guides/sentinel-3-slstr/coverage

  • The RapidEye RESA Germany Mosaic provides a nearly cloud-free view of the country’s geography, natural resources, and infrastructure. It is composed of 374,240 sqkm of multi-spectral RapidEye imagery, acquired between April and October 2015. The product is being provided in the framework of the RapidEye Science Archive (RESA) agreement. Co-funded by the German Federal Government, the fleet of RapidEye satellites were launched from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in 2008. The satellites are now owned by Planet Labs, Inc. The RapidEye Earth observation system comprises five satellites equipped with high-resolution optical sensors. With a spatial resolution of 6.5 m the 5-band instruments operate in the visible and near-infrared portions of the electromagnetic spectrum. With its high repetition rate the RapidEye constellation can image each point on the Earth’s at least once per day.